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Global Initiatives and Research

Compassion Network

Ms. McIvor serves on as a Core Counsel Member of the Greater Vancouver Compassion Network (GVCN) which is a non-profit network of institutions, organizations, working groups and individuals committed to furthering compassionate engagement and conduct in our communities.  The GVCN is taking action to connect civic leaders to an unprecedented cross-section of civil society, including youth, businesses, educators, ethical consumers, faith groups, and families. Its purpose is to energize engagement, mutual learning and collaboration by residents and civic leaders in support of respectful relationships, just economies and sustainable peace. The efforts of the network are non-religious, non-partisan, and locally relevant.  The GVCN embraces multiple intersections of interest or expertise, and the many ways that people can galvanize compassionate work in community with others.

The GVCN is endorsed by a group of prominent institutions and individuals that include The Dalai Lam Center for Peace and Education, Free The Children, Fair Trade Vancouver, Kindness Foundation of Canada, Christ Church Cathedral, Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Dialogue, Canadians for Compassion, United Way, InterSpiritual Centre of Vancouver Society, VanCity, and the Vancouver Foundation.

Kindness Foundation of Canada and the World Kindness Movement

Ms. McIvor serves on the Board of the Kindness Foundation of Canada whose mission is to inspire human connection and activate the practice of kindness locally and globally, to create a kind world one kind act at a time.

The Kindness Foundation is also members of the World Kindness Movement  whose chief object is to foster goodwill among the broad community – local, national and international – by way of kindness and in so doing, create greater understanding and co-operation between all people and all nations throughout the world. WKM is a worldwide coalition of various kindness movements—organizations that study and promote improved individual and collective human behavior.

Research in Morocco

During 2009/2010 I ventured off to Rabat, Morocco as part of my personal research regarding compassion.       I choose a volunteer vacation with a global organization called Cross Cultural Solutions and my volunteer placement was working in an orphanage where 250 children lived under the age of 6 years old.  I had the wonderful privilege of working in the nursery with 40 babies ranging in age from a few days old to 6 months.  My aha moment take away from this experience was the cultural integration and expanding my knowledge of the Muslim culture and that we are one truly one human family regardless of our varying beliefs and life styles.

Research and Collaboration in Singapore

In 2011 I was invited to Singapore to speak at an International Human Resources conference on the topic of kindness and compassion in the workplace.  There were over 5000 K delegates from all over South East Asia to attend the 3 day event.  This is the first time there as been a topic such as mine at the conference and it was wonderfully received with over 500 people attending the con-current session.

While in Singapore I also visited my colleagues who are members of the World Kindness Movement.  Singapore Kindness Movement is the past secretariat for the WKM and are great examples of how a kindness movement can make such a difference in the lives of citizens.  Check out their website at www.kindness.sg

Research in India

During 2011/12 I traveled to Northern India to do another volunteer vacation and to continue my personal exploration and research on compassion.  From the time I was 16 years old I had wanted to do volunteer work with Mother Teresa in Calcutta and 36 years later found myself at Mother Teresa’s Home for the Destitute and Dying in New Delhi where the poorest of the poorest are cared for by the Sisters of Charity.  In a home with 165 residents my greatest take away was judgment and compassion cannot reside together.  I also learned that compassion is not a commodity; you can’t trade it on the stock market, it does not come with an expiration date, nor is it of limited supply, therefore, you cannot loose it when you use it.